Oh yeah, it looks so good. I made a couple small changes in this colour. I really agree with everything that shannon said, too, so we should make those changes while we’re on the phone, maybe. Yes! (fist pump in the air).
Righto Shannon’s changes are done.

Here is our most updated proposal…. Lisa and I went through it on the phone together last night:

Exhibition Proposal
The Isolation Project
    Working together in a communal space is both challenging and inspiring but what happens when you collaborate yet are each in isolation? In the winter of 2009, Alana Wilson and Bridget Fairbank met whilst wittling away at plaster in the cold ceramic studio of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. Since then they have shared similar experiences as fire tower observers in Alberta, a seasonal job which holds them in solitude and isolates them in the wild.

Solitude- a state or situation of being alone
Isolate- to be or remain apart from others

    Solitude and isolation both occur either physically or cognitively. In both cases it is our sentiments and psyche that are affected. Solitude tends to amplify our thoughts and can foster great growth. In this time of narrowing frontiers and ever expanding modes of transport and communication, physical isolation is rare but an isolation constructed by society is becoming more and more common. Now the anonymity of the city dweller is more prevalent than ever. Often, we isolate ourselves by way of routine or cultural faux-pas. Bridget and Alana tell a story of a physical isolation akin to that of the pioneers before us, and the emotional isolation felt by most in modernity. Their isolation has resulted in the contemplation of self, of society, of what solitude means, of how it functions and of how it affects us all. By being physically isolated, the two grapple with cultural solitude through individual artistic explorations. The Isolation Project exhibits each artist’s manifestation of solitude and in turn invites the viewer to acknowledge their personal story of solitude and isolation.

    Alana Wilson’s inspiration for this work began with the work of artists such as Margaret Kilgallen and Barry McGee, the availability of materials in a remote situation, and the idea of capturing her scattered thoughts in an esthetically pleasing way. For her, the fire tower season is always a time of deep personal contemplation and questioning. Her contribution to The Isolation Project is a look at some of the ideas and pressures she ruminates on and feels as an isolated female in her early thirties. Even in this post-feminist era where establishing a career for herself is important, she still feels a societal and parental pressure to settle down and have babies. She often questions her desire to do, or not do, so. This has become a seemingly more common place perspective  in a time when more women are remaining independent for a longer period of time and attempting to find strength and fulfillment in themselves.

    A constant struggle has presented itself in Alana’s choices. Dualities such as Career vs. Family and  Love vs. Ambition are manifested through her work in words and phrases like Independence, Follow your heart, Freedom, and Selfish. These examples and many others have been embroidered and presented in frames, clustered together on the wall in no particular order; a visual representation of the way thoughts and ideas can come and go during time spent thinking alone in the forest or walking the streets of a city. Embroidery was chosen due to its portable nature and lightweight materials. This medium, traditionally practiced by school age girls and unmarried women, is something that Alana identifies with. The act of embroidering in itself provides time for contemplation of the story she is creating. She often feels that although solitude is necessary for growth and should be taken seriously and cherished, perhaps the most human desire is to have someone bear witness to our lives and tell our story. The Isolation Project is an illustration of this concept.

    Bridget Fairbank’s inspiration for the Isolation Project came as she traveled across Canada collecting plates and contemplating time. She regarded the extensive highway lines, thinking of the solitary summer regimented by routine that lay ahead as a fire tower observer. What would happen if the rhythm in which the day occurred was represented by space and line?

    Time never passes at an uniform pace. Each interval of action is different. When a collection of lines is made the thickness, uniformity and space between each line all speak to us visually as a concept of speed and pace. By making lines in overglaze pigments fired onto those found side plates from her journey, a plate for each day of isolation at tower, the juice and anxiety, the calm and serenity, the busyness and revelry of daily time is thus visually communicated. Why make lines on plates? The varied forms and surfaces of pre-owned dishes as an ensemble create a complex narrative. Through the recording of Bridget’s daily routines the existing imagery is slashed and distorted, eluding to the forgotten story of the day, the week, the decade and the place in which the plates were once culturally relevant and cared for dishes. The collection represents the blatantly varied nature of Canadian culture. By altering each dish, Bridget’s personal tale of daily isolation by way of routine is imposed upon each plate: a metaphor for every individual’s daily chaotic and isolated contribution to our multifaceted culture. Her project is a celebration of everyday solitary experience in a Canadian context. When presented on the wall in calendar format Bridget’s rhetoric of four months alone in the forest with her thoughts is indicated by space and line, evoking emotion and sparking contemplation of one’s individual life in relation to daily routine, time and culture.

    The Isolation Project is a recording of two lives spent in the isolation of the Canadian wilderness and the urban environment. Whether experienced physically or emotionally, isolation is felt by everyone at one time or another during this busy modern existence. The Isolation Project exemplifies that though solitude and isolation can be a reprieve from ordinary life, it is seldom a reprieve from oneself.

Here is what Miss Shannon Merrit had to say about it, I haven’t gone through her’s yet.

Notes:

  1. page 1 Paragraph one, sentence two:  could it read this way for a bit more flow?:  “In the winter of 2009, Alana Wilson anda Bridget Fairbank met whilst wittling away at plaster in the cold ceramic studio of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.”
  2. page 1 Paragraph 3, sentence 5: “Now the anonymity of the city dweller is more prevalent than ever in history.”  The “in history” might be a bit redundant.
  3. page 1 Paragraph 3, sentence 7:  “akin to that of the pioneers before us and the emotional isolation”  Whack a comma after “before us, and the …
  4. Page 2 paragraph 1 sentence 6:  “provides time for contemplationof the story she is creating.”  Whack a space beween “contemplation” and “of”
  5. page 2 paragraph 1 sentence 7: “She often feels that though solitude is necessary for growth and should be taken seriously even cherished,…”  Whack a comma between “seriously” and “even”
  6. page 2 paragraph 3 sentence 4… is a lot in 1 sentence.  Can it be worked?:  Bridget’s making lines using overglaze pigments and firing them on found plates from her cross-country journey.  Making a plate a day for each day in isolation at tower, these lines speak of the juice and anxiety, the calm and serenity, the business and revelry of daily time.  The lines visually communicates the tensions felt at tower.
  7. page 2 paragraph 3 sentence 7:  “the place in which the plates were once relevant cared for dishes”  Can it be “relevant and cared for dishes”?
  8. page 2 paragraph 3…”The collection represents the blatantly varied nature of Canadian culture”.  B, I don’t know that you need this.  It adds another layer that isn’t crucial to your theme and so muddies all the other good stuff you’re saying.  This project is less about canadiana and more about you surrounded by nothingness… within Canada, yes, but not so specifically that you need to mention it.
Wow, I love it!  Great idea and such a lovely mix of materials — thread and underglaze both holding the power of line-making!  Your conclusion is a wop-bang of a punch… really summarizes the project well.  Hope my notes are helpful.  And I love that you describe the final presentation… it’s like I’m already there!  xoxoxo and best luck!

Here you can download what Miss Lisa Hanlon had to say about it:

Exhibition Proposal, The Isolation Project – Lisa’s edits

Yay for prompt friends.

____________________________________________________________________________

Notes of what a proposal should explain….

1. what is the project?  2. why this project? 3. why this exhibition? How? 4. What it means to others?

Here is an example cover letter. Please make sure you contact info is how you’d like. Click to download.

can you please check my blog address? It’s missing an “s” in wordpress. other than that, I think that’s it. YOu’re so good at being on top of things.

The Isolation Project Proposal, Example Cover Letter PDF

Alana’s edit of Bridget’s editing of Alana’s Edit of Bridget’s most recent posting.

I am starting a new color: purple. Now what is this you about what I did being lost? If his is so- big biggie. But what evs’ I’ll give it a look….OK FINAL final. She is good to send to others.


Here is the PDF to send to whomever you want to read it:

Exhibition Proposal, The Isolation Project

Shit. I forgot to copy and paste so the last one that you did is now lost. No biggie? Big Biggie? 

 It’s looking pretty damn good.  Did a bit more tweaking. Now have we filled all the criteria above? Kind of, but not explicitly. I say we do one more edit and have other people give it a read. So this sucker can be whatever length we like now.

Working together in a communal space is both challenging and inspiring but what happens when you collaborate yet are each in isolation? Alana Wilson and Bridget Fairbank met whilst whittling away at plaster in the cold studios of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design ceramics department in winter of 2009. Since then they have shared similar experiences as fire tower observers in Alberta, a seasonal job which holds them in solitude and isolates them in the wild.

Solitude- a state or situation of being alone.
Isolate- to be or remain apart from others.
Solitude and isolation both occur either physically or cognitively. In both cases it is our sentiments and psyche that are effected. Solitude tends to amplify our thoughts and can foster great growth. In this time of narrowing frontiers and ever expanding modes of transport and communication, physical isolation is rare but an isolation constructed by society is becoming more and more common. Now the anonymity of the city dweller is more prevalent than ever in history. Often, we isolate ourselves by way of routine or cultural faux-pas. Bridget and Alana tell a story of a physical isolation akin to that of the pioneers before us and the emotional isolation felt by most in modernity. Their isolation has resulted in the contemplation of self, of society, of what solitude means, of how it functions and of how it effects us all. By being physically isolated, the two grapple with cultural solitude through individual artistic explorations. The Isolation Project exhibits each artist’s manifestation of solitude and in turn invites the viewer to acknowledge their personal story of  solitude and isolation.

Alana Wilson’s inspiration for this work began with the work of artists such as Margaret Kilgallen and Barry McGee, the availability of materials in a remote situation, and the idea of capturing her scattered thoughts in an esthetically pleasing way. For her, the fire tower season is always a time of deep personal contemplation and questioning. Her contribution to The Isolation Project is a look at some of the ideas and pressures she ruminates on and feels as an isolated female in her early thirties. Even in this post-feminist era where establishing a career for herself is important, she still feels a societal and parental pressure to settle down and have babies. She often questions her desire to do, or not do, so. This has become a seemingly more common place perspective  in a time when more women are remaining independent for a longer period of time and attempting to find strength and fulfillment in themselves.

A constant struggle has presented itself in Alana’s choices. Dualities such as Career vs. Family and  Love vs. Ambition are manifested through her work in words and phrases like Independence; Follow your heart; Freedom; and Selfish. These examples and many others have been embroidered and presented in frames, clustered together on the wall in no particular order; a visual representation of the way thoughts and ideas can come and go during time spent thinking alone in the forest or walking the streets of a city. Embroidery was chosen due to its portable nature and lightweight materials. The fact that embroidery was traditionally done  by school age girls and unmarried women has also been something that Alana could identify with. The act of embroidering in itself provides time for contemplation of the story she is creating. She often feels that though solitude is necessary for growth and should be taken seriously and even cherished, perhaps the most human desire is to have someone bear witness to our lives and tell our story. The Isolation Project is an illustration of this concept.

Bridget Fairbank’s inspiration for the Isolation Project came as she traveled across Canada collecting plates and contemplating time. She regarded the extensive highway lines, thinking of the solitary summer regimented by routine that lay ahead as a fire tower observer. What would happen if the rhythm in which the day occurred was represented by space and line much like the undulating road rolling soft ahead?

Time never passes at an uniform pace. Each interval of action is different. When a collection of lines is made the thickness, the uniformity and the space between each line all speak to us visually as a concept of speed and pace. By making lines in overglaze pigments fired onto those found side plates from her journey, a plate for each day of isolation at tower, the juice and anxiety, the calm and serenity, the business and revelry of daily time is thus visually communicated. Why make lines on plates? The varied forms and surfaces of pre-owned dishes as an ensemble create a complex narrative. Through the recording of Bridget’s daily routines the existing imagery is slashed and distorted, eluding to the forgotten story of the day, the week, the decade and the place in which the plates were once relevant cared for dishes. The collection represents the blatantly varied nature of Canadian culture. By altering each dish Bridget’s personal tale of daily isolation by way of routine is imposed upon each plate: a metaphor for the individual’s daily chaotic and isolated contribution in our multifaceted culture. Her project is a celebration of everyday solitary experience in a Canadian context. When presented on the wall in calendar format the rhetoric of four months alone in the forest with one’s thoughts is indicated by space and line, evoking emotion and sparking contemplation of one’s individual life in relation to daily routine, time and culture.

The Isolation Project is a recording of two lives spent in the seclusion of  the Canadian wilderness and the urban environment. Whether experienced physically or emotionally, isolation is felt by everyone at one time or another during this busy modern existence. The Isolation Project exemplifies that though solitude and seclusion can be a reprieve from ordinary life, it is seldom a reprieve from oneself.

____________________________________________________________________________

Bridget’s Editing and mash up of Alana’s second go at it and her second go at it, and woooo it is under dos paginas!

Working together in a communal space is both challenging and inspiring but what happens when you collaborate yet are each in isolation? Alana Wilson and Bridget Fairbank met whilst whittling away at plaster in the cold studios of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design ceramics department in 2009. Since then they have corroborated as fire tower observers in Alberta, a seasonal job which holds them in solitude and isolates them in the wild.

Solitude- a state or situation of being alone.
Isolate- to be or remain apart from others.
Solitude and isolation both occur either physically or cognitively, in both cases it is our sentiments and psyche that are effected. Solitude tends to amplify our thoughts and can foster the great growth. In this time of narrowing frontiers and ever expanding modes of transport and communication physical isolation is rare but, an isolation constructed by society is becoming more and more common. With the past exodus from farm to city, anonymity is more prevalent than ever in history. Often, we isolate ourselves by way of routine or cultural faux-pas. Bridget and Alana tell a story of the physical isolation akin to that of the pioneers before us and the emotional isolation felt by most in modernity. Their isolation has resulted in the contemplation of self, of society, of what solitude means, how it functions and how it effects us all. By being physically isolated the two grapple with cultural solitude through individual artistic explorations. The Isolation Project exhibits each artist’s manifestation of solitude and in turn invites the viewer to acknowledge their personal story of isolation.

Alana Wilson’s inspiration for this work began with the work of artists such as Margaret Kilgallen and Barry McGee, availability of materials and the idea of attempting to capture her scattered thoughts in an esthetically pleasing way. For her, fire tower season is always a time of deep personal contemplation and questioning. Her contribution to The Isolation Project is a personal look at some of the ideas she ruminates on and the pressures she feels as an isolated female in her early thirties, such as career vs. family and love vs. ambition. A seemingly more common place perspective in a time when more and more women are remaining independent for a longer period of time, putting off settling down and having families and finding strength in themselves.

Words, phrases and images that have received such contemplation are embroidered and presented in frames, clustered together on the wall in no particular order, a visual representation of the way thoughts and ideas can come and go during time spent thinking alone in the forest or walking the streets of a city. Embroidery was chosen due to its portable nature and lightweight materials. The fact that embroidery was traditionally done primarily by school age girls and unmarried women also speaks to the meaning of this project for Alana. The act of embroidering in itself provides time for reflection and contemplation on the story she is creating. She often feels that perhaps the most human desire is to have someone bear witness to our lives, to share in the experience, to tell our story. And yet still, solitude is necessary for growth and should be taken seriously and cherished.

Bridget Fairbank’s inspiration came as she traveled across Canada collecting plates and contemplating time. She regarded the extensive highway lines thinking of the solitary summer regimented by routine that lay ahead as a fire tower observer. What would happen if the rhythm in which the day occurred was represented by space and line? Bridget decided to discover if time could be linear.

Time never passes at an uniform pace. Each interval of action is different. When a collection of lines is made the thickness, the uniformity and the space between each line all speak to us visually as a concept of speed and pace. By making lines in overglaze pigments fired onto those found side plates from her journey, a plate for each day of isolation at tower, the juice and anxiety, the calm and serenity, the business and revelry of daily time is thus visually communicated. But, why make lines on plates? The varied forms and surfaces of pre-owned dishes as an ensemble create a complex narrative. Through the recording of Bridget’s daily routines the existing imagery is slashed and distorted eluding to the forgotten story of the day, the week, the decade and the place in which the plates were once relevant cared for dishes. The collection represents the blatantly varied nature of Canadian culture. All ceramic dishes yes, but all from different places and different times representing different things through varied forms and esthetics, just like our citizens and geography. By altering each dish Bridget’s personal tale of daily isolation by way of routine is imposed upon each plate: a metaphor for the individual’s daily chaotic and isolated contribution in our multifaceted culture. Her project is a celebration of everyday solitary experience (and the Canadian way). When presented on the wall in calendar format the rhetoric of four months alone with one’s thoughts of culture is indicated by space and line evoking emotion, sparking contemplation of one’s individual life in relation to daily routine, time and culture.

The Isolation Project is a recording of lives spent in the seclusion of both the Canadian wilderness and the urban environment. Whether experienced physically or emotionally, isolation is felt by most people at one time or another during this busy modern existence. Though solitude and seclusion can be a reprieve from ordinary life, it is seldom a reprieve from oneself.

____________________________________________________________________________

Alana

____________________________________________________________________________

Alana’s second go at it:

so, i made a whole schwack of notes in colour, but when i moved it from Pages to here, it didn’t transfer. so, I’ve tried to go back and re-do that, but I’m not sure I got it all. Anyway…

alana’s notes are in this colour (turquoise-ish?)

do we need to get this down to one page?  Two pages? We’ll have to gander at the galllery stipulations.

Working together in a communal studio space can be is both challenging and inspiring, feeding off of each other’s creativity and sharing ideas and methods, but what happens when you are working together  collaborate yet are each in isolation? Alana Wilson and Bridget Fairbank met whilst whittling away at plaster in the cold studios of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design ceramics department in 2009. Since that original encounter then they have kept in touch through the shared experience of working as corroborated as fire tower observers in Alberta, a seasonal job which holds them in solitude and isolates them in the wild.

Solitude- a state or situation of being alone.
Isolate- to be or remain apart from others.

Solitude and isolation both occur either physically or cognitively, in both cases it is our sentiments and psyche that are effected. Solitude tends to amplify our thoughts and can foster the great growth. In this time of narrowing frontiers and ever expanding modes of transport and communication, physical isolation is rare but an isolation constructed by society is becoming more and more common. With the past exodus from farm to city, anonymity is more prevalent than ever in history. Often, we isolate ourselves by way of routine or cultural faux-pas. Cultural constructs and fear may stop one from striking up a conversation with a passerby in the city.  Bridget and Alana aim to tell a story of the physical isolation akin to that of the pioneers before us, and the emotional isolation felt by most in modernity. This isolation has resulted in the contemplation of self, of society and of what solitude means, how it functions and how it effects us all. By being physically isolated the two grapple with cultural solitude through individual artistic expression, experimentation, and explorations. The proposed exhibition of The Isolation Project exhibits each artist’s manifestation of solitude and in turn invites the viewer to acknowledge their personal story of isolation.

in turn invites the viewer to recognize and acknowledge their personal story of isolation and and come to terms with the way solitude presents itself in their own lives.   (Why are we making solitude sound bad? I love my solitude and my project is a celebration of everyday solitary experience…ok this is getting to messy- I’ve posted a legible mash up above.)

Alana Wilson’s inspiration for this work began with the work of artists such as Margaret Kilgallen and Barry McGee, availability of materials and the idea of attempting to capture her scattered thoughts in an esthetically pleasing way. For her, fire tower season is always a time of deep personal contemplation and questioning. Her contribution to The Isolation Project is a personal look at some of the ideas she ruminates on and the pressures she feels as an isolated female in her early thirties, such as career vs. family and love vs. ambition. A seemingly more common place perspective in a time when more and more women are remaining independent for a longer period of time, putting off settling down and having families and finding strength in themselves.

Words, phrases and images that have received such contemplation are embroidered and presented in frames, clustered together on the wall in no particular order, a visual representation of the way thoughts and ideas can come and go during time spent thinking alone in the forest or walking the streets of a city. Embroidery was chosen due to its portable nature and lightweight materials. The fact that embroidery was traditionally done primarily by school age girls and unmarried women also speaks to the meaning of this project for Alana. The act of embroidering in itself provides time for reflection and contemplation on the story she is creating. She often feels that perhaps the most human desire is to have someone bear witness to our lives, to share in the experience, to tell our story. And yet still, solitude is necessary for growth and should be taken seriously and cherished.

Bridget Fairbank’s experimentation of space and line as a representation of time came to her while travelling across Canada, collecting plates, and contemplating the lonely highway and solitary summer, regimented by routine, which lay ahead. By attempting to record the rhythm of each day of the season in lines on found plates, Bridget sought to discover if time could be linear.   (for example, what do you think about this in third person? i just think the whole proposal will flow better and seem tidier if it’s all in the same voice.)

(Third person is just dandy. We have to watch what tense we are writing in… shall we stick to present or past?)

Time never passes at a uniform pace. Each interval of action is different. When a collection of lines is made, the space between lines, the thickness and the uniformity of line, all speak to us visually as a concept of speed and time and pace. The juice and anxiety, the calm and serenity, the business and revelry of time is thus visually communicated.  When presented on the wall in calendar format, the rhetoric (pace) indicated by space and line evokes an emotional reaction, feeling or inkling, sparking contemplation of one’s individual life in relation to daily routine, time and culture.

The varied forms and surfaces of pre-owned dishes, when viewed as a group, create an additional narrative. The slashing through of existing imagery and distortion/layers of additional firings elude to the story of the day, the week, the decade in which the plates were once. Every dish was chosen and scrummaged on a journey across Canada to look objectively at craft in Canada. Thus, this collection of plates represents the blatantly varied nature of Canada. All ceramic dishes yes, but all from different places, different times and representing different things (values, concepts) through varied form and esthetics, just like Canadian citizens and geography. By uniting them and imposing my daily life and psyche upon the collection, my time, life and consequently the physical lines are imposed upon the plates: a metaphor for the solitary lens each person uses to interpret at all times. these plates represent Canada and the individual’s chaotic and isolated contribution in our multifaceted culture. (Too long, but only a first go of it indeed)

The Isolation Project is a recording of lives spent in the seclusion of both the Canadian wilderness and the urban environment. Whether experienced physically or emotionally, isolation has been felt by most at one time or another during this busy modern existence. Though solitude and seclusion can be a reprieve from ordinary life, it is a never a reprieve from oneself.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————-

super duper rough draft. i know it’s short, but it’s just the beginning, right?

Working together in a communal studio space can be both challenging and inspiring, feeding off of each other’s creativity and sharing ideas and methods. but what happens when you are working together yet each in isolation? two artists, both working at fire towers in different areas of alberta, with two completely different projects and expressions of a life in seclusion. The isolation proposal project takes a look at the marking of time by two young women, an idea thought up before the beginning of the fire tower season and executed throughout the summer of 2011 and beyond.

Alana Wilson’s take on the project was inspired by artists such as Magaret Kilgallen and Barry McGee, availability of materials and the idea of traditional women’s work. It is a personal look at some of the ideas she ruminates on and the pressures she feels as an isolated female in her early thirties. (give example of ideas?) A seemingly more common place perspective in a time when more and more women are remaining independent for a longer period of time. Words, phrases and images that have had much rumination are embroidered and presented in frames, clustered together on the wall like a brainstorming chart, in no particular order, like the thoughts that come and go during time spent alone in the forest and the city.

Can you post some Magaret Kilgallen and Barry McGee work for me one the blog?

____________________________________________________________________________

Bridget

____________________________________________________________________________

Rough Draft:

Alana Wilson and Bridget Fairbank met whilst attending Nova Scotia School of Art and Design in 2009 whittling away at plaster and at time before the fire season and their months alone spotting forest fires. Prior and since that original encounter both have seasonal jobs that hold them in solitude and isolate them in the wild. Solitude and Isolation both occur either physically or cognitively, in both cases it is our sentiments and psyche that is effected. In our modern day of age with narrowing frontiers and ever expanding modes of transport and communication physical isolation is rare and an isolation constructed by society is common. The truth is that we often isolate ourselves by way of routine or cultural faux-pas. Etiquette (cultural construct) stops one from striking up a conversation with a passerby in the city, in small town you may not pass a person without a chat. With the past exodus from farm to city anonymity is more prevalent than ever in history. Theirs is a different story, one of physical isolation akin to that of the pioneers before us. It has resulted in the contemplation of self, of society and of what solitude means, how it functions and how it effects us all. By being physically isolated the the two grapple with cultural solitude by way of artistic expression, experimentation, exploration. The proposed exhibition in turn invites (demands) the viewer grapple (recognize. acknowledge) with their personal story of isolation and come to terms with solitude. In the following segments each artist explains their specific motives and body of work.

 Alana: e thlaldaladshadshldshl

Bridget: While traveling across Canada and collecting plates I thought about time and what would happen if everyday I reported the rhythm in which the day occurred by representation of space and line. I contemplated the lonely highway and my solitary summer and life regimented by routine. I decided to discover if time could be linear, time lines being overglaze pigments fused in a third firing onto those found side plates of my journey, a plate for each day.

Time never passes at an uniform pace. Each interval of action is different. When a collection of lines is made the space between lines, the thickness and the uniformity of line all speak to us visually as a concept of speed and time and pace. The juice and anxiety, the calm and serenity, the business and revelry of time is thus visually communicated.  When presented on the wall in calendar format the rhetoric (pace) indicated by space and line evokes an emotional reaction, feeling or inkling, sparking contemplation of one’s individual life in relation to daily routine, time and culture.

The varied forms and surfaces of pre-owned dishes give, as an ensemble, create an additional narrative. The slashing through of existing imagery and distortion/layers of additional firings elude to the story of the day, the week, the decade in which the plates were once relevant cared for dishes. Every dish was chosen and scrummaged on a journey across Canada to look objectively at craft in Canada. Thus, this collection of plates represents the blatantly varied nature of Canada. All ceramic dishes yes, but all from different places, different times and representing different things (values, concepts) through varied form and esthetics, just like Canadian citizens and geography. By uniting them and imposing my daily life and psyche upon the collection, my time, life and consequently the physical lines are imposed upon the plates: a metaphor for the solitary lens each person uses to interpret at all times. these plates represent Canada and the individual’s chaotic and isolated contribution in our multifaceted culture. (Too long, but only a first go of it indeed)

 In conclusion, for both.sdkd;ds;dj;

____________________________________________________________________________

Bridget’s Convoluted Working Notes:
Solitude and Isolation are both constructs/concepts that occur in two ways, physically or cognitively either way it is our sentiments and psyche that is effected.

Solitude- a state or situation of being alone.
Isolate- to be or remain apart from others.

Our actions can isolate us. Our thoughts can isolate us. Our location can isolate us.

In our modern day of age with narrowing frontiers and ever expanding modes of transport and communication physical isolation is rare and an isolation constructed by society is common. The truth is that we often isolate ourselves by way of routine or cultural faux-pas. Etiquette (cultural construct) stops you from striking up a conversation with a passerby in the city, in small town you may not pass a person without a chat. With the past exodus from farm to city anonymity is more prevalent than ever in history. Ours is a different story, one of physical isolation akin to that of the pioneers before us, that has resulted in the contemplation of self, of society and of what solitude means, how it functions and how it effects us all.

By being physically isolated the we grapple with cultural solitude by way of artistic expression, experiments, explorations.

“To be a part, that is fulfillment for us: to be integrated with our solitude into a state that can be shared.” Rainer Maria Rilke

“Solitude is a truly interior affair, and to realize this insight and live accordingly amounts to the best and most helpful form of progress. This is ultimately  a matter of things that are not quite in our control, and success, which is after all so simple, is comprised of thousands of factors: we never quite know what.” Rainer Maria Rilke

***Bearing witness
Perhaps the most human desire is that to have someone bare witness to our lives. Propaganda is always promoting the individually to become active in a community to participate  to belong but, at the core we know that we are alone, that solitude is necessary and should be taken seriously and cherished, that no one can bare witness to our innermost workings.

Humans are pack animals.
In search for solitude.

“Ultimately, this is what constitutes the events and value in the world: that time and time again one hears of someone who has said things that one has thought only obscurely and who has done things that one had expressed only at an moment. Such things make you grow. This awareness of conduits and lines reaching from distant solitary figures and from us to god knows where and to whom, this I consider our best feeling: it leaves us alone and yet simultaneously patches us into a great community take hold and help an hope.” p.37 Rainer Maria Rilke

Reprieve from ordinary life, not a reprieve from one’s self.

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